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  1.  

    Inspect Your Brakes Everyday!

     

    • Approach the vehicle: No leaks or anything hanging loose.
    • Tug Test: Apply parking brake (yellow valve), gently try to move forward; make sure brakes hold. Do same with trailer (red valve).
    • Service Brakes: Pull forward and apply brakes firmly. Report unusual pulling or delayed stopping action.
    • Air Compressor: Correct cut out between 120 -135psi. Cut in between 20-25psi below cut out pressure.
    • Air Leakage Rate: Air system fully charged, brake valves in, key on, apply brake pedal. After initial drop, pressure loss no more than 4psi in 1min.
    • Low Pressure Alarm/Signal/Spring Brakes: Pump down brakes; signal comes on when pressure goes below 60psi. Valves pop out (spring brakes apply) 20-40psi.
    • Air Pressure Build: Engine 1000rpm; pressure builds to 85-100psi within 3 min.
    • Hoses/Couplings: No cracks, chafes, or leaks.
    • Slack Adjusters: No broken, loose, or missing parts. Angle between push rod and adjuster arm slightly past 90 degrees with brakes released (also when pulled by hand no more than 1” of movement). Not less than 90 degrees when brakes are applied.
    • Brake Chambers: No leaks, cracks, or dents. Securely mounted.
    • Brake Drums: No cracks, dents, or holes. No loose or missing bolts. Lining shouldn’t be rusting.
    • Air/Electrical Lines: No audible leaks. No cuts, chafing, rubbing, tangled, pinched, or showing of inner lining. Glad-hands/Pigtail firmly seated in place.
    • Air Tanks: Free of moisture and debris.
    • Check Brake Lights: Weight on, or stick between Brake pedal and seat; brake pedal is depressed. Do a visual check.
  2. Exchanging Information

    Aug 27

    Posted in Safety

    Exchanging Information:

    After any accident, regardless of the severity of the damage, you must exchange information with any other involved drivers, witnesses, passengers, property owners or any other involved party. When possible collect this information before the police arrive.

     

    Always be certain to gather and record the following information:

     

    • the other driver's or property contact’s full name
    • contact information (telephone number / address)
    • driver’s license number
    • insurance company
    • vehicle insurance policy number
    • the full name and contact information of the owner of the other vehicle or property if it is different
    • the other vehicle’s license plate numbers
    • the vehicle information (year/make/model/color/VIN) of the other car
    • the DOT # and company name if applicable
    • Names and badge numbers of any police on the scene
    • If you have a camera (even if it is just your cell phone) take pictures of the accident scene area and damages to vehicles from all angles

     

  3. We are currently seeking a Customer Service Representative for our Somerset, KY terminal.  Responsibilities will include: maintaining a set group of customer accounts, building relationships, relaying information on shipments/deliveries, scheduling and booking freight, monitoring trailer pools, and performing other duties as necessary.  Must have a minimum of 3 years of customer service experience in a high volume call center, one year inside sales experience, and be able to type 40 wpm.  If interested, send your resume:  smaat@superservicellc.com

  4. Vehicle Inspection Reports

    Complete the pre-trip and post trip inspections using a routine to help ensure you check all safety related items and identify defects. Document the inspection on your DVIR and note completion in your log. Remember that any safety-related defects must be repaired prior to placing the vehicle in service, or next dispatch. Send in a Macro 14 and notify breakdown and your DM of the issue so they can help resolve the problem on a timely basis.   

  5. Super Service, LLC is an exciting dry van carrier operating primarily East of the Mississippi River.  We are looking to build our Brokerage Department by adding a highly motivated, self- starting, creative individual willing to learn the full truckload brokerage business.  This is an exiciting opportunity to learn and help us build a business.  This position will be located in our Grand Rapids, MI headquarters.  Degrees in supply chain management, logistics, or marketing preferred.  If interested, please send your resume to:  smaat@superservicellc.com

  6. Need to Maintain Space Ahead

    Always try to maintain space around your vehicle. The most important space to maintain is the one in front of you--the space you're driving into.

    You need space ahead to avoid the need to make a sudden stop. According to accident reports, the vehicle trucks and buses most often run into is the one in front of them.

    The most frequent cause is following too close.

    Remember, if the vehicle ahead of you is smaller than yours, it can stop faster than you can. If they stop and your only choices are to make a lane change, run off the road, or hit the vehicle in front of you, then you are most likely following too close. Always allow a minimum of 7 seconds following distance.

  7. Is My Driving Safe?

    Aug 24

    Posted in Safety

    Is My Driving Safe?

    Super Service LLC utilizes a company called “Is My Driving Safe” to observe our drivers’ behaviors out on the road. During an observation there will be three check points. Each check point measures key elements: truck speed vs. posted speed limit, following distance, road conditions, and road topography. The observer will also note whether you had your lights on, used your turn signals, had your seat belt on, etc. Many of the observations are conducted by off duty or possibly on duty DOT officers, so there is always the possibility that if they observe bad behaviors you can receive a citation and/or DOT Inspection.

    Additional, feedback about driving behavior comes from a variety of sources including motor vehicle reports, accident reports and roadside violations to name a few. However, the driver should be the most influential source about their driving. They have the most to lose if involved in a crash or multiple driving citations. And, regulated drivers roadside violations can be reviewed by prospective employers that could determine employability in the future. Only you know how many chances you are willing to take while driving.

    No matter where the information is obtained, the ultimate goal is to reduce violations and keep our drivers safe.

      

  8. Check for Leaks

    Aug 23

    Posted in Safety

    Check for Leaks

    Vehicles should not have any visible or active oil or grease leaks. If during the inspection process an oil or grease leak is detected it should be repaired prior to the vehicle being placed into service. This includes leaking wheel seals, leaking differential seals or leaking oil pan gaskets.

     

     

  9. Always Check Your Brakes

    Aug 22

    Posted in Safety

    Always Check Your Brakes

    Approach the vehicle: No leaks or anything hanging loose.

    Tug Test: Apply parking brake (yellow valve), gently try to move forward; make sure brakes hold. Do same with trailer (red valve).

    Service Brakes: Pull forward and apply brakes firmly. Report unusual pulling or delayed stopping action.

    Air Compressor: Correct cut out between 120 -135psi. Cut in between 20-25psi below cut out pressure.

    Air Leakage Rate: Air system fully charged, brake valves in, key on, apply brake pedal. After initial drop, pressure loss no more than 4psi in 1min.

    Low Pressure Alarm/Signal/Spring Brakes: Pump down brakes; signal comes on when pressure goes below 60psi. Valves pop out (spring brakes apply) 20-40psi.

    Air Pressure Build: Engine 1000rpm; pressure builds to 85-100psi within 3 min.

    Hoses/Couplings: No cracks, chafes, or leaks.

    Slack Adjusters: No broken, loose, or missing parts. Angle between push rod and adjuster arm slightly past 90 degrees with brakes released (also when pulled by hand no more than 1” of movement). Not less than 90 degrees when brakes are applied.

    Brake Chambers: No leaks, cracks, or dents. Securely mounted.

    Brake Drums: No cracks, dents, or holes. No loose or missing bolts. Lining shouldn’t be rusting.

    Air/Electrical Lines: No audible leaks. No cuts, chafing, rubbing, tangled, pinched, or showing of inner lining. Glad-hands/Pigtail firmly seated in place.

    Air Tanks: Free of moisture and debris.

    Check Brake Lights: Weight on, or stick between Brake pedal and seat; brake pedal is depressed. Visually check back of equipment; brake lights are ON.

  10. Take the Pledge to Wear Your Seat Belt  

    I will wear my safety belt because my wellbeing greatly affects my family and loved ones. It is my responsibility to maintain control of my vehicle. Using my safety belt is my best chance of remaining in control of my truck in a crash or emergency situation. I will always remember to buckle up.

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