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  1. “Attitude not Aptitude will Determine Your Altitude”

    A pleasant, friendly, helpful attitude is not only a good sign of toughness, but also a sign of genius.

    Toughness is measured by how much you can take, not how much you can dish out. Many people can throw a hard punch, but how many can take a punch? How many can take a punch and still smile? You have to be pretty tough to do it.

    A good attitude is a sign of genius too. Most people know a smile can get you farther than a frown. A smile in the face of a difficult task somehow makes it seem less difficult.

    A good attitude can also help you live longer. Just look at comedians George Burns (100), Bob Hope (99) and Milton Berle (91).

    A bad attitude can give you an ulcer, a heart attack or stroke, and can even get you into a fight, which of course can lead to even more injury to yourself. People with a bad attitude hurt themselves. It’s a terrible burden they have to carry.

    Driving a truck is a tough job. There is traffic and construction and everybody’s patience is tested. Everywhere you look there is a ‘stupid’ driver messing it up for everyone else. Tempers are flaring between drivers. Truckers are almost getting into fights with each other. As much as you’d love to, you can’t cuss out a four-wheeler, because he doesn’t have a CB. But a truck does; and drivers are cussing each other out, simply because they can, and that puts a strain on all listening ears.

    It takes a tough genius to do what you do. Patience is a skill, just like backing and steering. Dig deep, it’s there. Fake it for a while and soon it will be real. A trucker without patience is like a mechanic without a screwdriver. Hopefully most of you won’t have to look hard to find it.

    Smile, and be safe!

  2. Safe Driving: Stopping Distance

    Semi-tractor trailers cannot stop on a dime. One of Newton's laws of motion says: "An object in motion will stay in motion, unless an outside force acts upon it." Obviously, a loaded big rig takes longer to stop than a four-wheeled vehicle. However, professional drivers need to allow an even greater amount of total stopping distance based on conditions.
    Driving in any of the following situations requires greater total stopping distance: at night, on secondary roads, in hilly or mountainous areas, along curvy roads, or whenever precipitation is falling or the roads have received precipitation.
    The formula to calculate Total Stopping Distance is: Perception Distance + Reaction Distance + Brake Lag Distance + Effective Braking Distance = Total Stopping Distance
    Braking and stopping distance are also affected by a truck's speed and weight. There are significant differences in stopping ability at 55mph and 65mph, or between a truck with a loaded trailer, a truck with an empty trailer (aka "deadhead"), and driving just the tractor (aka "bobtail").
    You might think it would be easier to stop with just the tractor or with no load on the trailer, but we've found that just the opposite is true.

  3. Change lanes as little as possible.

    Pick a lane and STAY in it. Cars will dodge and change lanes no matter what. If you do find it necessary to change lanes, use your turn signal,move over very carefully, being aware of your blind spots and constantly check your mirrors.

    The odds of an accident increases dramatically, each time a vehicle makes a move to another lane. If you have maintained your lane position and following distance, in the event of an accident, the other vehicle will most likely be at fault, not you.
    When entering or leaving the freeway, watch for merging vehicles. Cars love to hug the right lane and dodge all over.... they tend not to merge or seem to forget how to do so safely.  Good following distance and looking far ahead of you, will help anticipate a merging vehicle. If you can’t change lanes safely, slow down and let them in.

  4. Slow Down…..

    Apr 24

    Posted in Safety

    Slow down.....

    THE most important of driving safety tips for truckers.This point cannot be stressed enough.Big trucks don't corner like a Ferrari, nor do they handle like one. Always take the corners and ramps very slowly. Speed signs on ramps are for cars, not big rigs. It doesn't matter if you hold up traffic. The main focus is to get around a corner and be 'upright'.
    Travel slowly and maintain control. There's never a need to get above 3rd gear in a parking lot. Always drive with care and control.

    Drive at a safe speed for the conditions; never above the speed limit. Don't drive as fast as you think you can get away with.

  5. Truckers Against Trafficking

    Youth sex trafficking along America’s highways is a problem hiding in plain sight.

    Many runaways or abducted teens are forced into this situation. Often it just takes a phone call to save someone’s child being held against their will.

    If you see anything out of the ordinary, don’t be afraid to call the authorities. It could save somebody’s life.

    For more information visit truckersagainsttrafficking.org.

    To report trafficking, call the organization’s national hotline at 888-373-7888.

  6. Proper Backing

    Apr 22

    Posted in Safety

    ProperBacking

    When you must back up remember:

    Look at Your Path – GOAL(Get Out And Look).

    Look at your line of travel before you begin. Get out and walk to the area you need to back into and around the vehicle. Check your clearance on the ground, to the sides, and overhead, in and near the path your vehicle.

    Roll down your windows.

    Put on your four-ways and tap your horn to signal your intentions.

    Use Mirrors on Both Sides.

    Check the outside mirrors on both sides frequently. Get out of the vehicle and re-inspect your path if you are unsure.

    Back Slowly.

    This will let you make corrections before you get too far off course. As soon as you see the trailer getting off the proper path, correct it by turning the top of the steering wheel in the direction of the drift.

    Pull Forward.

    When backing a trailer, make pull-ups to re-position your vehicle as needed.

    Safety should always be a top priority in backing, and the little time that it takes to GOAL is worth it.

  7. Sun Glare

    Apr 21

    Posted in Safety

    Sun Glare

    Just after sunrise and before sunset the sun will shine directly into drivers’ eyes, leaving many motorists driving with a glare. Driving into the sun can make it much harder to see ahead and is an added risk to drivers.

    So how can you protect yourself?

    ·         Invest in polarized sunglasses – they can help reduce glare.

    ·         Utilize your sun visor – it can help to block out the sun.

    ·         Leave more following room – when the sun is in your eyes it can be hard to see what the car ahead is doing. This is one more time when it pays to leave more room between you and the next vehicle.

    ·         Drive with your headlights on to increase your visibility to other drivers.

    ·         Slow Down!

    Additional tips:

    ·         Keep your windshield clean, inside and out

    ·         Check your windshield for pitting and cracks

    ·         Avoid storing papers or other items on the dashboard

    ·         If having a difficult time seeing the road, use lane markings to help guide you.

    Rarely will visibility be absolutely perfect while driving, but if motorists know this and make the proper adjustments, you can minimize any additional risks that come with less-than-optimal visual conditions.

  8. Spotlight on CSA: Crash Indicator

    The Crash Indicator BASIC is one of seven categories that the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) uses to determine how a motor carrier ranks relative to other carriers with a similar number of safety events (i.e., inspections, violations, or crashes). FMCSA defines the Crash Indicator BASIC as histories or patterns of high crash involvement, such as frequency and severity. It is based on information from State-reported crashes that meet reportable crash standards. A crash is not specifically a behavior but instead the consequence of a behavior or set of behaviors. The consequence of a behavior(s) can point to a problem that needs attention.

    Not having a violation in the other BASICS and following safe driving procedures is the first step in having a crash free record, and helping to improve the company’s CSA Score.

    Better CSA Scores improve our ratings with current customers and helps us gain new customers. More freight keeps your wheels rolling and gives opportunity to earn more dollars.

    Remember a clean, proper logged inspection earns you a $50 bonus!

  9. Spotlight on CSA: Controlled Substances/Alcohol

    Controlled Substances/Alcohol BASIC deals with the operation of commercial motor vehicles by drivers who are impaired due to alcohol, illegal drugs, and the misuse of prescription or over-the-counter medications. Some example roadside violations that may cause a motor carrier to rank poorly in this BASIC include a driver(s) failing an alcohol test, which indicates an alcohol level of .02 or greater, and operating under the influence of illegal drugs.

    Prohibited Drugs include but are not limited to: Amphetamines, Methamphetamines, Benzoylecgonine (Cocaine), Cannabinoids (Marijuana), Codeine, Hydromorphone (Dilaudids), Morphine (Heroin), Phencyclidine (PCP). If you’re taking a prescription drug, prescribed by a medical doctor, you need to tell him you have a CDL license and drive truck for a living. He is you best source of telling you what he has prescribed is prohibited or will not affect your CDL License.

    Making sure you are not under the influence before operating any vehicle is another step in having a violation free record, and helping to improve the company’s CSA Score.

    Better CSA Scores improve our ratings with current customers and helps us gain new customers.  More freight keeps your wheels rolling and gives opportunity to earn more dollars.

    Remember a clean, properly logged inspection earns you a $50 bonus!

  10. Spotlight on CSA: Driver Fitness

    The most written violations in the Driver Fitness BASIC- for Super Service, LLC drivers:

     

    #1. Driver lacking physical qualification(s) - missing eyeglasses, hearing aid.

    #2. Driving a CMV while CDL is suspended for a safety-related or unknown reason and in the state of driver's license issuance. (child support issues, auto insurance issues)

    #3. Driving a CMV while disqualified. Suspended for safety-related or unknown reason and in the state of driver's license issuance (licensed state not in possession of updated medical certificate). #4. Expired medical examiner's certificate

    #5. Operating a CMV without a CDL in driver's possession

    Making sure your credential are current and keeping fit is the first step in having a violation free record, and helping to improve the company’s CSA Score.

    Better CSA Scores improve our ratings with current customers and helps us gain new customers. More freight keeps your wheels rolling and gives opportunity to earn more dollars.

    Remember a clean, properly logged inspection earns you a $50 bonus!

     

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