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  1. "The Superman Mentality"

    This is the attitude that nothing bad can happen to us no matter how bad our behavior. It's like the person is immune to the negative consequences of his or her bad actions. When a person with this attitude actually receives negative consequences for one or more of their bad actions, it comes as a surprise.

    But it shouldn't.

    Actions have consequences. The consequences may not be immediate, but they come sometime. They may affect you personally; they may affect others. But they come.

    When it comes to safe driving, a consistent investment in good behavior or actions can help keep negative consequences minimized in your life. Of course, accidents do happen even to the safest of drivers. But you can minimize the likelihood of those taking place by being cautious and not doing tasks too quickly. 

  2. Secure Loose Objects

    Jul 21

    Posted in Safety

     

    Secure Loose Objects

    Please make sure that all loose equipment is secure before driving.

    Never store objects in the driver’s foot-space because, under heavy braking or cornering, these items can move and reduce your ability to use the pedals. Never store objects around the gear shift Loose objects on the dashboard or center console such as CD cases, loose change, and mobile phones can be distracting as they slide around while the driver turns a corner

    Many injuries are caused by loose objects that “fly” around during a collision. When your vehicle goes through a sudden deceleration (as in a collision), loose objects temporarily keep traveling at the speed the vehicle was originally going, until it hits something.  These projectiles can become deadly if they hit you or your passenger.

    A Commercial Vehicle with items on the dash or piled around the passenger seat is an invitation for a DOT inspection.

  3. Just Because You Have A CDL...

    Having a Commercial Drivers License doesn’t make you a Safe Driver;

     Any more than having a Lottery Ticket makes you a Millionaire. 

  4. Buckle Up!

    Jul 19

    Posted in Safety

    A 6″ bruise is better than 6′ under – Buckle up! 

    Always wear you seat belts. The cemetery is full of drivers who wished that they had buckled up the last time.

  5. Never a Good Excuse for Speeding

    “I didn’t know I was speeding.”

    “There must be something wrong with my speedometer.”

    “I’m not from around this area.”

    “I didn’t see the sign.”

    “I was going down a hill!” – We hear this one a lot from our professional CDL Drivers.

    “Everyone else was speeding.” – The most heard excuse.

    All the excuses in the world won’t bring back a loved one killed when they or someone else didn’t obey the speed limit. 

  6. Be Prepared for Bright Sunlight

     “When you get up in the morning and the light is hurtin’ your head
    The first thing you do when you get up out of bed
    Is hit that streets a-runnin' and try to beat the masses
    And go get yourself some cheap sunglasses” 

    When sunrise occurs later in the morning, it can also present challenges for drivers. Have a pair of sunglasses in the vehicle to wear when the sun is bright is a good strategy. If it becomes too difficult to see because of bright sunlight or glare, a good strategy is for the driver to pull over (to a safe and legal location) until he or she can see again. 

  7. TEN RULES TO PRESERVE YOUR TEN FINGERS

    1) BEWARD OF PINCH POINTS. Train yourself to recognize pinch points and avoid placing your hands and fingers in such hazardous spots.

    2) EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED. When using wrenches, persuaders, bars, and other hand tools with which you expect resistance, anticipate that the tool might slip or the object to which pressure is being applied may suddenly give way.

    3) INSPECT TOOLS. Wrenches with worn or spread jaws, a mushroom-headed chisel, a worn screwdriver, a hammer with a cracked handle are examples of defective tools.

    4) DO NOT WORK ON MOVING EQUIPMENT UNNESCESSARILY. If the equipment can be stopped, do so.

    5) REPLACE MACHINE GUARDS FOLLOWING REPAIRS THAT REQUIRE REMOVAL OF GUARDS.

    6) BE AWARE OF EQUIPMENT THAT STARTS AUTOMATICALLY. Never work on such equipment without eliminating the possibility of automatic startup.

    7) DE-ENERGIZE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PRIOR TO WORKING ON IT.

    8) BE MINDFUL WHEN CLOSING DOORS. Attention to detail can prevent this painful and sometimes serious injury. Also, watch for children’s fingers.

    9) AVOID TOUCHING LINES OR EQUIPMENT THAT IS HOT. Every hot line or hot piece of equipment is a potential source of painful injury.

    10) IF THE WORK BEING PERFORMED REQUIRES GLOVES, USE THEM. Gloves offer protection from wood and metal splinters, caustics, acids, electrical burns, thermal burns, chemicals, and many other sources of injury. 

  8. Protective Foot Wear

    Jul 15

    Posted in Safety

    Protective Foot Wear

    Flip Flops and sandals are not permitted around the truck, the yard, the customer or the terminal. You may wear shower shoes only when taking a shower, you need to change before you leave the building.

    You must have proper footwear on when climbing in and out of the tractor or the trailer, or when operating/driving any machinery.

    Your feet are the foundation of your body and means for transporting yourself. A cut or infection can stop your ability to provide for your family. Please take proper care of your feet by having and using footwear that covers your toes and supports your foot for your job as a professional driver.

    Protective footwear and dress is also required for riders.

  9. Warnings, Citations, or Inspections    

    Whenever a driver receives a warning, citation or Inspection it is required that he/she insures the motor carrier receives a copy of the documentation (within 24hrs). Currently the quickest way to make sure that occurs is to fax the documentation to: 404-795-0887.  A driver should keep a copy in their own file just in case the document doesn’t go through. If faxing is not available the next option is to send a copy of the documentation in a “DO NOT SCAN” TripPak Envelope (this is not a regular TripPak Envelope).

    Any time a driver is in the process of receiving a warning, citation or inspection it is required that they log all the time as “On Duty” and include the remark such as “DOT Inspection”.

    Any time there is a mechanical defect item listed on the documentation, a macro 14 should be sent to the breakdown department and the item needs to be repaired soon after the defect/violation is noted.

    Notify your Driver Manager anytime you receive a warning, citation, or inspection.

    As always, a violation free inspection that is turned in, and properly logged, will earn the driver a $50.00 bonus. 

  10. Entering/Exiting

    Jul 13

    Posted in Safety

     

    Entering/Exiting

     

    Follow these tips to safely enter or exit your vehicle – including trailers:

    Don’t use tires or wheel hubs as a step surface.

    Don’t use the doorframe or door edge as a handhold.

    Wear footwear with good support and slip resistance.

    Don’t climb up or down with something in your hand;leave it on the vehicle floor and retrieve it after getting safely in or out.

    Don’t rush to climb out after a long shift.

    Descend slowly to avoid straining a muscle.

    Be extra careful when working in inclement weather.

    Exit and enter facing the cab.

    Get a firm grip on rails or handles.

    Never Jump! You may land on an uneven surface, off balance or on something. Look before exiting.

    Most importantly – always use 3 points of contact!  

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